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Undefeated Missouri beats Houston Christian 105-69

Undefeated Missouri beats Houston Christian 105-69

COLUMBIA, Mo. — DeAndre Gholston scored 22 points, Kobe Brown had 19 points and undefeated Missouri eased past Houston Christian 105-69 on Saturday.Missouri has won its first seven games of a season for the first time since the 2013-14 team began 10-0. The Tigers play at Wichita State (3-2) on Tuesday. Missouri made four 3-pointers in a game-opening 16-0 run. The Tigers started the game shooting 85% from the field (11 of 13) for a 27-5 lead. Gholston scored a season-high 17 points in the first half. Noah Carter added 14 points and D’Moi Hodge had 13 points and five steals for Missouri. Carter also had five assists and Mizzou eclipsed 20 for the seventh game in a row, using 28 helpers for 43 baskets.Missouri entered with the nation’s sixth-ranked scoring offense at 91.3 points per game. The Tigers finished 43-of-67 shooting (64.2%) with 11 3-pointers.Maks Klanjscek scored 17 points and Andrew King had 13 points, seven rebounds and four steals for Houston Christian (1-6). Tristan Moore added 11 points. The Huskies turned it over 23 times.———More AP college basketball: https://apnews.com/hub/college-basketball and https://apnews.com/hub/ap-top-25-college-basketball-poll and https://twitter.com/AP—Top25

Gut-Behrami claims 1st WCup GS win in 6 years; Shiffrin 13th

Gut-Behrami claims 1st WCup GS win in 6 years; Shiffrin 13th

KILLINGTON, Vt. — World champion Lara Gut-Behrami improved on her second run Saturday to win her first World Cup giant slalom in more than six years, with Mikaela Shiffrin finishing 13th.Gut-Behrami was third in the opening run on the course in Killington, Vermont, but just did enough to edge out Marta Bassino of Italy by 0.07 seconds. Defending Olympic champion Sara Hector, who had led after the opening run, was third — 0.20 behind Gut-Behrami.The 31-year-old Gut-Behrami won gold in the discipline at the world championships in Cortina last year but the Swiss had not won a World Cup GS race since October 2016.Shiffrin — who won the two season-opening slalom races last weekend — was 1.4 seconds back on home snow, and the passionate crowd will be expecting more on Sunday.While Shiffrin hails from Vail, Colorado, she can almost consider Killington a hometown race as she honed her skills nearby at the Burke Mountain Academy as a teenager.Shiffrin had finishes of second, third, fourth and fifth in giant slaloms in Killington but has won all five World Cup slaloms held there.She will be favorite to make it six out of six in the slalom on Sunday. It would be Shiffrin’s 50th World Cup win in that discipline. No other skier has won more titles in a single competition than the 27-year-old Shiffrin.———More AP skiing: https://apnews.com/hub/skiing and https://twitter.com/AP—Sports

World Cup Now: Mbappe the man in France's win over Denmark

World Cup Now: Mbappe the man in France's win over Denmark

France became the first team to qualify for knockout stage of the tournament with a 2-1 victory over Denmark Saturday at Stadium 974. Former United States men’s national team players DaMarcus Beasley, Jimmy Conrad and Sacha Kljestan discuss their big three takeaways from the match on “World Cup Now.” Beasley: France has a championship mentality […]

Energy-rich Qatar faces fast-rising climate risks at home

Energy-rich Qatar faces fast-rising climate risks at home

AL RAYYAN, Qatar — At a suburban park near Doha, the capital city of Qatar, cool air from vents in the ground blasted joggers on a November day that reached almost 32 degrees Celsius (90 degrees Fahrenheit). The small park with air-conditioned paths is an apt illustration of World Cup host Qatar’s answers, so far, to the rising temperatures its people face. The wealthy Gulf Arab nation has been able to pay for extreme adaptive measures like this thanks to the natural gas it exports to the world.A small peninsula that juts out into the Persian Gulf, Qatar sits in a region that, outside the Arctic, is warming faster than anyplace else on earth.“It’s already bad. And it’s getting worse,” said Jos Lelieveld, an atmospheric chemist at Germany’s Max Planck Institute. Part of the reason is the warming waters of the Persian Gulf, a shallow, narrow sea that contributes to stifling humidity in Qatar during some months.“It’s a pretty difficult environment. It’s quite hostile,” said Karim Elgendy, an associate fellow at the London-based Chatham House think tank. Without its ability to pay for imported food, heavy air-conditioning and desalinated ocean water, he said, the contemporary country couldn’t exist. Already, Qatar has faced a significant rise in temperatures compared to pre-industrial times. Scientists and others concerned about climate change are trying to keep the Earth as a whole from warming by more than 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit) on average because research shows it will be profoundly disruptive, making many people homeless, inundating coastlines and destroying ecosystems. “Qatar has an enormous amount to lose in terms of the effects of climate change,” said Mohammed Ayoub, a professor at the Environment and Energy Research Institute at Qatar’s Hamad bin Khalifa University. It is one of the world’s hottest countries and will experience even more heat extremes, floods, droughts and sand and dust storms. CLIMATE PLEDGES If Qatar is one of the world’s wealthiest nations per capita, it is also one of the most polluting per person. Around this country slightly smaller than the U.S. state of Connecticut, large SUVs are a common sight, filled with cheap gasoline. Air-conditioning blasts the insides of buildings year-round. Even the country’s drinking water is energy intensive, with nearly all of it coming from desalination plants that burn fossil fuel for the force needed to press ocean water through tiny filters to make it consumable.In recent years, Qatar has inched forward making climate pledges. At the 2015 Paris climate talks, it did not commit to reducing emissions, but set a goal six years later to cut emissions 25% by 2030. One way would be to use carbon capture and storage at gas production facilities, a much-discussed technology that has yet to be deployed at scale.Recently, the country also connected a solar power plant to its electric grid that could power 10% of the nation’s energy needs at full capacity.In Doha, there is a new metro system, more green spaces and parks, and the upscale Msheireb district which was designed to take advantage of natural wind flows.But it’s not clear that Qatar can reach its reduction goal in seven years. At the recent U.N. climate conference in Egypt, Qatar’s environment minister Sheikh Faleh bin Nasser bin Ahmed bin Ali Al Thani said the country was “working to translate these ambitions to facts.”The ministry of environment and climate change did not respond to multiple requests from The Associated Press for comment on its emissions reduction plan. In the past, it has said that one key effort will be to diversify Qatar’s economy. Many observers say hosting the World Cup is part of branching out from oil and gas to become an entertainment and events destination. But to hold the event, Qatar built enormous amounts of infrastructure over a 12-year period — with a massive carbon footprint, despite its claims otherwise. “They can’t diversify without spending money,” said Elgendy. “And that money will come from oil and gas. It’s a bit of a conundrum.” GLOBAL DEMAND FOR GASQatari officials and some academics argue that exporting liquefied natural gas to the world can help the transition to clean energy because the fossil fuel is less polluting than oil and coal. That view is increasingly unsupported by science as the extent of leaks from natural gas infrastructure becomes clear. Leaking natural gas is far more harmful for the climate than carbon dioxide, ton for ton. Earlier this year, state-owned gas giant Qatar Energy joined an industry-led pledge to reduce nearly all methane emissions from operations by 2030. Methane is the the principal constituent of natural gas. But a real turn away from fossil fuels has yet to begin here.After Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, Europe’s race to replace gas from that country left Qatar — among the world’s top natural gas producers and exporters — in pole position to benefit. Qatar inked new deals with several energy companies, including a recent 27-year agreement to provide liquefied natural gas to Chinese oil and gas company Sinopec. “Since the war in Ukraine, everyone is talking to the Qataris now to see if they can get that gas,” Elgendy said.———Follow Suman Naishadham on Twitter: @SumanNaishadham ———AP World Cup coverage: https://apnews.com/hub/world-cup and https://twitter.com/AP—Sports

No. 14 Maryland women beat Towson at Fort Myers Tip-Off

No. 14 Maryland women beat Towson at Fort Myers Tip-Off

FORT MYERS, Fla. — Diamond Miller scored 20 points, Faith Masonius and Shyanne Sellers each added 14 and No. 14 Maryland beat Towson 81-70 on Saturday at the Fort Myers Tip-Off.Miller gave Maryland its first double-digit lead on the first basket of the fourth quarter to make it 59-49. Towson got as close as eight points from there, but Abby Meyers started a 6-0 run as Maryland went back ahead by 10-plus for good.Meyers finished with 11 points for Maryland (5-2), which was coming off a 76-67 loss to DePaul on Friday. Miller was 8-of-12 shooting and grabbed seven rebounds, and Masonius was two points shy of her career high of 16 points.Miller and Masonius each had 10 points in the first half and Maryland closed on a 7-0 run for a 39-34 lead at the break.Skye Williams led Towson (3-2) with 19 points. Kylie Kornegay-Lucas had 16 points, seven rebounds, eight assists and four steals. India Johnston scored 17.Maryland coach Brenda Frese is just three wins away from 600 for her career. The Terps wrap up play in tournament on Sunday against Pittsburgh. ———AP women’s college basketball: https://apnews.com/hub/womens-college-basketball and https://apnews.com/hub/ap-top-25-womens-college-basketball-poll and https://twitter.com/AP—Top25

Navy takes down Mount St. Mary's 75-59

Navy takes down Mount St. Mary's 75-59

ANNAPOLIS, Md. — Tyler Nelson scored 18 points as Navy beat Mount St. Mary’s 75-59 on Saturday.Nelson shot 7 for 8, including 4 for 4 from beyond the arc for the Midshipmen (5-1). Daniel Deaver scored 14 points while finishing 7 of 11 from the floor, and added six rebounds, six assists, and three steals. Kam Summers recorded 14 points and shot 6 for 8, including 2 for 4 from beyond the arc.Jalen Benjamin finished with 12 points for the Mountaineers (3-4). Dakota Leffew added 10 points for Mount St. Mary’s. George Tinsley also put up nine points, six rebounds and two blocks.———The Associated Press created this story using technology provided by Data Skrive and data from Sportradar.

Loyola (MD) defeats UL Monroe 65-64

Loyola (MD) defeats UL Monroe 65-64

NICEVILLE, Fla. — Kenneth Jones scored with seven seconds left and David Brown III blocked a last-second shot and Loyola (MD) defeated UL Monroe 65-64 on Saturday.Chris Kuzemka’s 12 points on 4 of 8 shooting (4 for 7 from distance) led the Greyhounds (3-4). Jones was 5 of 12 shooting (1 for 4 from distance) to add 11 points. Isaiah Alexander was 4 of 9 shooting (2 for 5 from distance) to finish with 10 points.The Warhawks (2-5) were led by Victor Baffuto, who posted 20 points, eight rebounds and two blocks. Thomas Howell added 12 points, six rebounds and three steals for UL Monroe. In addition, Savion Gallion finished with 11 points.———The Associated Press created this story using technology provided by Data Skrive and data from Sportradar.