Home » Archives by category » Politics (Page 3)

Biden calls for more gun control before GOP takes House, says 'sick' to allow semi-automatic weapon sales

Biden calls for more gun control before GOP takes House, says 'sick' to allow semi-automatic weapon sales

President Biden said on Thursday that he would push Congress to enact new gun control laws before Republicans took control of the U.S. House of Representatives in January. Biden told reporters during a press event in Nantucket, Massachusetts that the recent shooting at an LGBT nightclub in Colorado had reinforced the need to pass an assault weapons ban. “The idea we still allow semi-automatic weapons to be purchased is sick,” said Biden. “It has no socially redeeming value… Not a single solitary rationale for it except profit for the gun manufacturers.”Semi-automatic guns, including handguns and rifles, fire one bullet for each pull of the trigger.Biden said he would push federal lawmakers to enact a new assault weapons ban before January when the next Congress took office and Republicans gained control of the House.COLORADO SHOOTING SUSPECT’S FATHER, A FORMER MMA FIGHTER AND PORN STAR, ‘PRAISED’ SON FOR ‘VIOLENT BEHAVIOR’
President Biden talks with reporters during a visit on Thanksgiving Day to the Nantucket Fire Department in Nantucket, Massachusetts, Thursday, Nov. 24, 2022.
(AP Photo/Susan Walsh)”I’m going to try,” said the president. “I’m going to try to get rid of assault weapons.” BIDEN PITCHES BANNING ASSAULT WEAPONS AT DEM FUNDRAISER: ‘I DON’T KNOW MANY DEER WEARING KEVLAR VESTS’Biden said he would engage lawmakers to make a broader assessment of whether success is possible. At the moment, the odds appear long. 
President Biden said the recent shooting at an LGBT nightclub in Colorado had strengthened his resolve to pass an assault weapons ban. 
(Photo by Helen H. Richardson/MediaNews Group/The Denver Post via Getty Images)Democrats control the House by a narrow margin until January. The Senate, meanwhile, is split 50-50 between both parties. For a sweeping gun control package to pass, including a ban on assault weapons, at least 10 GOP supporters will be needed to break the Senate’s 60-vote filibuster threshold. CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APPEarlier this year, Biden’s call for an assault weapons ban fell flat with Republicans, even as nearly two dozen GOP senators bucked the gun lobby to advance a bipartisan gun bill. The political environment is unlikely to get easier in January. While Democrats lost control of the House to Republicans, the party kept narrow control of the Senate — albeit nowhere near enough to break an expected filibuster without GOP support. 

Biden phone call to Thanksgiving parade broadcast begins with 20 seconds of confusion: 'Can you hear me?'

Biden phone call to Thanksgiving parade broadcast begins with 20 seconds of confusion: 'Can you hear me?'

President Biden and first lady Jill Biden called into NBC’s coverage of the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade Thursday, but the conversation got off to a rocky start.NBC’s Dylan Dreyer greeted the president at the beginning of the segment, but the two parties struggled to connect for around 20 seconds. “Can you hear me, Mr. President?” Dreyer asked.”We’re here,” Biden responded.”Oh, I was so worried this call wasn’t going to go through,” said Dreyer.BIDEN PARDONS TWO TURKEYS IN THANKSGIVING TRADITION
President Biden speaks with firefighters as he visits a Nantucket, Massachusetts, fire station to thank first responders during the Thanksgiving Day holiday, on Nov. 24, 2022.
(MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty Images)The president and first lady eventually established a clearer connection and were able to talk about their yearly Thanksgiving trip to Nantucket, Massachusetts, where the Bidens met with and thanked emergency personnel.”I want to say thanks to the firefighters and police officers, first responders. They never take a break,’ the president said after the connection was normalized.BIDEN BACKERS BRACE FOR HUNTER BIDEN REVELATIONS AHEAD OF GOP INVESTIGATIONS
President Biden waves as he leaves after visiting a Nantucket, Massachusetts, fire station to thank first responders during the Thanksgiving Day holiday, on Nov. 24, 2022.
(MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty Images)”And God bless our troops for sure,” the Jill Biden chimed in.”And by the way, we’re going to be talking to some of our troops later in the day, both here and abroad. I hope everybody remembers. We remember them every single day,” Biden continued. “God bless our troops for real!”CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP
President Biden pardons Chocolate, the National Thanksgiving Turkey, as he is joined by the 2022 National Turkey Federation Chairman Ronnie Parker and Alexa Starnes, daughter of the owner of Circle S Ranch, on the South Lawn of the White House Nov. 21, 2022, in Washington, D.C.
(Win McNamee/Getty Images)Biden pardoned two turkeys from North Carolina on Monday, “Chocolate” and “Chip,” which he said is his favorite ice cream flavor. 

Progressives urge supporters to see Thanksgiving as 'Indigenous Day of Mourning'

Progressives urge supporters to see Thanksgiving as 'Indigenous Day of Mourning'

Progressive groups and advocates lambasted the notion of celebrating Thanksgiving on Thursday, instead urging supporters to recognize the holiday as an “Indigenous Day of Mourning.” Left-wing activists said it was important to recognize the history and plight of Native Americans since the founding of the United States. “We stand with all native peoples on this Indigenous Day of Mourning,” said the Sunrise Movement, a far-left climate group. “For centuries indigenous people have led the fight for liberation and climate justice. Solidarity forever.”United American Indians of New England were the first to recognize Thanksgiving as a national day of mourning. Since 1970, the group has gathered at Plymouth, Massachusetts, the cite of one of the first pilgrim colonies in North America, to protest the “genocide of Native Americans, theft of tribal lands, and erase of culture.” LOS ANGELES SCHOOL DISTRICT’S THANKSGIVING PRESENTATION SUGGESTS STUDENTS’ UNDERSTANDING OF HOLIDAY IS ‘WRONG’
A man inspects a float of Tom Turkey that is lined up for the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade on Wednesday, Nov. 23, 2022. 
(AP Photo/Andres Kudacki)”Today is Thanksgiving Day, and it is also the National Day of Mourning, which remembers the genocide of millions of Native Americans and their ongoing erasure today,” said Qasim Rashid, a Democratic Party activist and Sirius XM host. “In giving thanks today, let us also reflect and act to stop the ongoing genocide of America’s Indigenous Peoples.” NATIVE AMERICANS MOURN ON THANKSGIVING: ‘NO REASON TO CELEBRATE’
Native American protesting Maine schools
(AP Photo/David Sharp, File)Some groups, like the ACLU of Connecticut, even urged supporters to be cognizant that they were likely occupying land that once belonged to Native American tribes. CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP”For many Indigenous persons, today is a day of mourning and of loss,” the group said in a statement. “It’s important that we take time to honor our Indigenous family by learning about the native land we all occupy.” 

Hakeem Jeffries, Pelosi's likely replacement, supports commission to study slavery reparations

Hakeem Jeffries, Pelosi's likely replacement, supports commission to study slavery reparations

Rep. Hakeem Jeffries, the top candidate to replace Nancy Pelosi as House Democratic leader, supports legislation to study the feasibility of providing reparations to the descendants of enslaved individuals. Jeffries, D-N.Y., is one of nearly 200 co-sponsors of a bill to create a national commission to study and develop proposals on slavery reparations. The 13-member commission would be tasked with presenting appropriate remedies to the lingering negative effects of slavery and discrimination within the United States. “The call for reparations represents a commitment to entering a constructive dialogue on the role of slavery and racism in shaping present-day conditions in our community and American society,” said Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee, a Texas Democrat who authored the legislation. Although the bill has failed to make progress in the Democratic-controlled House since 2019, its support has grown in recent years. Jeffries was one of the bill’s early supporters when it was first introduced in 2019. ELECTION DENIER HAKEEM JEFFRIES COULD REPLACE PELOSI AS HOUSE DEM LEADER
“The least we can do is study these historic wrongs,” said Rep. Hakeem Jeffries. “That’s the least that this Congress can do.”
(Reuters)During a hearing on the bill in the House Judiciary Committee last year, Jeffries said a study on reparations was the least that Congress could do after generations of injustice. WHO IS HAKEEM JEFFRIES, HOUSE DEMOCRATS’ LIKELY NEXT LEADER?”We’re not going to move on because after slavery, [there was] Jim Crow and the rise of the KKK,” Jeffries said at the time. “And the lynching epidemic. And Plessy v. Ferguson. And Black Wall Street in 1921 destroyed.” 
Rep. Hakeem Jeffries is seen as the top candidate to replace Nancy Pelosi as House Democratic leader next Congress. 
(Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images)”This is a great country, we’ve come a long way, we still have a long way to go, we’re not perfect, but we’re marching to a more perfect union,” said Jeffries. “The least we can do is study these historic wrongs. That’s the least that this Congress can do.”CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APPJeffries announced his bid to succeed Pelosi last week. The 52-year-old New Yorker has received nearly universal support for his ascension. His path was further cleared when Rep. Pramila Jayapal, a Washington Democrat who chairs the nearly-100 member Congressional Progressive Caucus, opted to not mount a run of her own. 

Alaska's Tshibaka: McConnell's millions 'would have been better spent in other states'

Alaska's Tshibaka: McConnell's millions 'would have been better spent in other states'

Kelly Tshibaka, an Alaska Republican backed by former President Trump, is blaming Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell for her failure to oust centrist GOP Sen. Lisa Murkowski this election cycle. Tshibaka, a former Alaska state official, conceded the contest on Wednesday after the latest rounds of vote tabulations showed Murkowski winning. The race took weeks to call given Alaska’s ranked-choice voting system, a process in which voters select their preferred candidates in order and the vote share is distributed to the top two after a process of elimination. While Tsibaka blamed ranked-choice voting for her loss, calling the system frustrating and a “incumbent protection program,” she also said McConnell had some responsibility. “It is regrettable that Sen. Mitch McConnell spent millions of dollars in this race on deceptive ads to secure what he wanted – a Senate minority that he can control, as opposed to a majority that he could not,” she said. “Donors’ money would have been better spent in other states to elect more Republicans that would have secured a majority in the Senate.” ALASKA SEN. LISA MURKOWSKI WINS RE-ELECTION TO US SENATE OVER CHALLENGER KELLY TSHIBAKA
The Alaska contest was seen as a proxy battle between Sen. Mitch McConnell and former President Trump.
(Samuel Corum/Bloomberg via Getty Images)Tshibaka said her loss to Murkowski was just “another victory for the Washington, D.C., insiders who rarely have our best interests at heart.” WHAT IS RANKED CHOICE VOTING, THE NEW ELECTION PROCESS USED IN ALASKA?The Alaska contest was seen by many as a proxy battle between McConnell and Trump. The former president sought to punish Murkowski for having voted to convict him after his impeachment for allegedly inciting the Jan. 6, 2021 assault on the U.S. Capitol. 
“It is regrettable that Sen. Mitch McConnell spent millions of dollars in this race on deceptive ads to secure what he wanted,” said Kelly Tshibaka. 
(PATRICK T. FALLON/AFP via Getty Images)”She’s a total creature of the Washington swamp but much worse than that and a tool of a corrupt establishment, the likes of which we’ve never seen,” Trump said of Murkowski during a July rally in Alaska. “The fake news media loves her.” McConnell, who is slated to become the longest-serving Senate leader in history in January, lined up behind Murkowski. The move was largely in keeping with the Kentucky Republican’s noted practice of supporting incumbents. 
“I am honored that Alaskans – of all regions, backgrounds and party affiliations – have once again granted me their confidence to continue working with them and on their behalf in the U.S. Senate,” said Sen. Lisa Murkowski. 
(Lisa Murkowski re-election campaign)A super PAC aligned with McConnell and other political groups spent heavily to bolster Murkowski. According to the Center for Responsive Politics, outside groups spent nearly $7 million attacking Tshibaka and just over $6 million in positive ads highlighting Murkowski’s accomplishments. Murkowski said her win was premised on putting together a diverse coalition of Republicans, independents, and even some Democrats. CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP”I am honored that Alaskans – of all regions, backgrounds and party affiliations – have once again granted me their confidence to continue working with them and on their behalf in the U.S. Senate,” she said. “I look forward to continuing the important work ahead of us.” 

EXCLUSIVE: Former Warnock opponent implores high turnout in Georgia Senate runoff to propel Walker to victory

EXCLUSIVE: Former Warnock opponent implores high turnout in Georgia Senate runoff to propel Walker to victory

MILTON, Ga. – EXCLUSIVE: Former Republican Georgia Sen. Kelly Loeffler is imploring Georgians to turn out in large numbers for the Dec. 6 runoff election between incumbent Democratic Sen. Raphael Warnock and GOP nominee Herschel Walker.In an exclusive interview with Fox News Digital following a Walker campaign rally in Milton, Georgia, Loeffler, who narrowly lost to Warnock in her own runoff election in January 2021, emphasized that turnout will be key to propel Walker to victory, and she touted his performance on Election Day despite the massive advantage in spending by Democrats on the race.”I’m all in for Herschel. Herschel has been working so hard. He’s going to stand up and defend our Georgia values, our American values. He’s working every day, so I’m right there alongside of him making sure that we get the vote out,” Loeffler said when asked why she decided to get back out on the campaign trail to stump for Walker.‘GEORGIA MATTERS’: TED CRUZ ISSUES WARNING OVER POSSIBLE WARNOCK VICTORY, SAYS DEM LIES ABOUT VOTING RECORD
Former Georgia Sen. Kelly Loeffler campaigns for Republican Senate nominee Herschel Walker during a rally on Nov. 21, 2022, in Milton, Georgia.
(Jessica McGowan/Getty Images)Loeffler said that every election is about turnout, but that it is particularly important in runoff elections. She then pointed to the size of the crowd at the Walker rally, which numbered close to 300 supporters, and noted it was a good sign to see such numbers during Thanksgiving week.”That’s what it’s going to take, really strong turnout because, look, Herschel Walker got outspent by over $70 million and there’s only a 35,000 vote difference in a state of 7 and a half million registered voters. So, it is vital that turnout is ours this time,” she said.Loeffler dismissed any potential challenges that former President Trump’s announcement that he would be a candidate for president in 2024 would pose for Walker in the race, considering Trump’s underwater favorability ratings in the state.GEORGIA SUPREME COURT ALLOWS EARLY VOTING SATURDAY IN US SENATE RUNOFF ELECTION
Republican Senate nominee Herschel Walker talks with supporters during a rally on Nov. 21, 2022, in Milton, Georgia.
(Jessica McGowan/Getty Images)”Look, when I’m out with Georgians every day talking to them, they’re about what’s going on around the kitchen table, the impact on their lives, the out-of-control spending in Washington, the woke indoctrination in the schools, crime, open borders. They’re very focused on someone that can come solve their problems right now in 2022. So, they’re focused on the kitchen table and not palace intrigue,” she said.When asked who she thought should be at the top of a future Republican presidential ticket, Loeffler said there is “an incredibly deep bench” in the party and that it is important for voters’ voices to be heard.
Then-Sen. Kelly Loeffler, R-Ga., gestures as she speaks during a runoff election night party, Jan. 6, 2021, in Atlanta.
(Alex Wong/Getty Images)”That’s what this is all about. And, you know, President Trump put America first, and I think anyone else who gets on the ballot is going to try to have that America First agenda, because that’s the only agenda that works for this country,” she said.CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP Loeffler added that she has no current plans to run for political office.The runoff between Warnock and Walker will be held on Tuesday, Dec. 6, with early voting scheduled to begin on Saturday, Nov. 26, and end on Friday, Dec. 2.

Alaska incumbent Rep. Mary Peltola wins full term to represent state's at-large congressional district

Alaska incumbent Rep. Mary Peltola wins full term to represent state's at-large congressional district

Incumbent Alaska Democratic Rep. Mary Peltola has defeated her general election challengers including former Gov. Sarah Palin to represent Alaska’s at-large congressional district for a full term in the House, The Associated Press projects.Alaska’s sole congressional district is currently represented by Democrat Rep. Mary Peltola after she won a special election in August to fill the remainder of former GOP Rep. Don Young’s term, which ends in January 2023.Four candidates advanced to the November general election in August, including Peltola, Palin, Republican Nick Begich, and libertarian Chris Bye.The general House election in Alaska uses ranked-choice voting, a system approved by Alaska residents in 2020 that dismissed the state’s previous election method consisting of partisan primary elections ahead of general elections. Under ranked-choice voting, candidates of all parties in the general election appeared on the same ballot.GET THE LATEST 2022 MIDTERM ELECTION RESULTS FROM FOX NEWS’ ELECTION CENTER
From left to right: Alaska GOP House candidate Nick Begich, Alaska GOP House candidate Sarah Palin, and Alaska Democrat House candidate Mary Peltola.
(Brandon Bell, Mary Peltola campaign, Ash Adams for The Washington Post via Getty Images)Ranked-choice voting allows voters to rank candidates in order of preference on their ballots. Should one candidate receive a majority of first-preference votes, that individual is declared the winner in the race. However, if no candidate wins a majority of first-preference votes, the candidate with the fewest first-preference votes is eliminated. Following the elimination of the candidate who received the least amount of first-preference votes, voters’ second-preference choices are evaluated and a new tally is established to determine whether a candidate in the race has received a majority of the vote. That process is repeated until a candidate wins over 50 % of the vote.Palin, in an opinion piece published by the Anchorage Daily News in October, said the ranked-choice voting system, used for the first time in the special election won by Peltola, had “produced the travesty of sending a Democrat to Congress to represent Alaska, one of the reddest states in the country.”ALASKA CONGRESSIONAL DEBATE: PELTOLA, PALIN, BEGICH AND BY SQUARE OFF ON INFLATION, GAS PRICES, STUDENT LOANSThe candidates in the race were all provided with an opportunity late last month in a debate to address concerns among voters including record-high inflation, gas prices and salmon distribution — a key issue specific to Alaska’s fisheries.
Former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin speaks as former U.S. President Donald Trump looks on during a “Save America” rally at Alaska Airlines Center on July 09, 2022 in Anchorage, Alaska.
(Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)Palin, who also sought to fill Young’s seat in the August special election, was endorsed by former President Donald Trump in the race. Palin served as the late Sen. John McCain’s running mate in the 2008 presidential election and formerly served as governor of Alaska from 2006 until her resignation in 2009.”Inflation is at a 40-year high, and we are in a recession. It’s a shame our president and his [Democratic] Party refuse to acknowledge that we are suffering from a recession,” Palin remarked.”We need to drill baby, drill,” she added. “Energy costs are the driver of inflation. Energy costs affect everything that we do in America [and] everything that we consume.”Peltola admitted during the debate that the U.S. was in a recession and said we have “astronomically high inflation rates across the country.”
Rep. Mary Peltola, D-Alaska
(PATRICK T. FALLON/AFP via Getty Images)”This is especially true in Alaska when you compound that with shipping costs,” the congresswoman said.CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APPHe added: “The dysfunctional energy policy this administration has brought upon us has been a factor for inflation.”Fox News’ Lawrence Richard contributed to this article.